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Rye’s Battle of the Century with Author Lisa Moll Sat. 6/18 at 1pm

Join the Rye Historical Society and Rye Public Library as they co-sponsor a book discussion and signing event!

In her new book Rye’s Battle of the Century: Saving the New Hampshire Seacoast from Olympic Oil, University of New Hampshire graduate student Lisa Moll reshapes local environmental history with extensive research revealing Rye’s crucial role in protecting the local environment.  In 1973-74, the Town of Rye drove the debate and defeat of Aristotle Onassis’ attempted construction of a massive marine terminal, pipeline and oil refinery along the Seacoast of New Hampshire.

Rye’s Battle of the Century adds new insights and people to the story, including a closer examination of Rye activists who battled the attempted marine terminal along the Isles of Shoals, thwarting Olympic’s efforts to create an industrial gateway into the state of New Hampshire.

Come meet the author, Lisa Moll, and Peter Horne, former Chair of Rye’s opposition group, Concerned Citizens of Rye (CCR). Copies of Rye’s Battle of the Century will be available for purchase at the event.

Oil Battle

Rye’s Battle of the Century with Author Lisa Moll Sat. 6/18 at 1pm

Join the Rye Historical Society and Rye Public Library as they co-sponsor a book discussion and signing event!

In her new book Rye’s Battle of the Century: Saving the New Hampshire Seacoast from Olympic Oil, University of New Hampshire graduate student Lisa Moll reshapes local environmental history with extensive research revealing Rye’s crucial role in protecting the local environment.  In 1973-74, the Town of Rye drove the debate and defeat of Aristotle Onassis’ attempted construction of a massive marine terminal, pipeline and oil refinery along the Seacoast of New Hampshire.

Rye’s Battle of the Century adds new insights and people to the story, including a closer examination of Rye activists who battled the attempted marine terminal along the Isles of Shoals, thwarting Olympic’s efforts to create an industrial gateway into the state of New Hampshire.

Come meet the author, Lisa Moll, and Peter Horne, former Chair of Rye’s opposition group, Concerned Citizens of Rye (CCR). Copies of Rye’s Battle of the Century will be available for purchase at the event.

Oil Battle

College Planning: Cash Flow During College Years – Wed. July 15th at 7pm

7-15 College PrepCertified College Planning Specialist Joshua Bartlett shares information in the final of a three part series on college planning and financial preparedness.  Okay, your son or daughter is accepted into a college program.  Congratulations!  Now how do you pay for it?  Learn more about where to house college savings, minimizing borrowing, interest rate analysis and the effects of income and payments on financial aid.

 

College Planning: Cash Flow During College Years – Wed. July 15th at 7pm

7-15 College PrepCertified College Planning Specialist Joshua Bartlett shares information in the final of a three part series on college planning and financial preparedness.  Okay, your son or daughter is accepted into a college program.  Congratulations!  Now how do you pay for it?  Learn more about where to house college savings, minimizing borrowing, interest rate analysis and the effects of income and payments on financial aid.

 

Reading Suggestions on Islam

Link to reading list

Rye’s Oldest Homes Thursday April 23 at 7pm

Join us as the Rye Public Library and Rye Historical Society cooperatively present a  power point talk about Rye’s historic homes and specifically the moving of the historic Marston House from Hampton to Rye in 1975.   This presentation will be given by Rye historian Alex Herlihy.

While many other historical homes will be considered, the majority of the presentation will concern the Marston house.   Originally built in 1654 , it was expanded in the early1700’s and 1840.  The history of this home represents three centuries of Marstons, one of the founding families of Hampton which used to include the southern part of Rye.

4-23 Old Homes

Rye’s Oldest Homes Thursday April 23 at 7pm

Join us as the Rye Public Library and Rye Historical Society cooperatively present a  power point talk about Rye’s historic homes and specifically the moving of the historic Marston House from Hampton to Rye in 1975.   This presentation will be given by Rye historian Alex Herlihy.

While many other historical homes will be considered, the majority of the presentation will concern the Marston house.   Originally built in 1654 , it was expanded in the early1700’s and 1840.  The history of this home represents three centuries of Marstons, one of the founding families of Hampton which used to include the southern part of Rye.

4-23 Old Homes

Portsmouth’s African Burying Ground Wed. Feb. 25th at 7pm

In 2015, the Portsmouth Community will complete the years long effort to honor those buried beneath Chestnut Street in Portsmouth’s downtown.

The Portsmouth African Burying Ground and Memorial Park – We Stand in Honor of Those Forgotten is the result of a dramatic revelation unearthed from a City street that has led to a forgotten people being brought to life and a community embracing its full history.  On an October morning in 2003, a series of coffins were revealed during infrastructure upgrades in the heart of the Portsmouth’s downtown.  Through archaeology and DNA analysis the City confirmed the site was a segregated burying place for Africans and their descendants (likely both enslaved and free) and that as many as 200 individuals are buried below.  Their names are unknown and their resting place – in use from the early 1700s through to the 19th century – was paved over, built over and mostly forgotten.

The presentation will focus on what is known about the site’s history, the community’s efforts to memorialize the site, and a description of the Memorial and its components.

Join us to share in this powerful story at an illustrated lecture in honor of Black History Month.  Snow date Feb. 26th.

2-25 African

Portsmouth’s African Burying Ground Wed. Feb. 25th at 7pm

In 2015, the Portsmouth Community will complete the years long effort to honor those buried beneath Chestnut Street in Portsmouth’s downtown.

The Portsmouth African Burying Ground and Memorial Park – We Stand in Honor of Those Forgotten is the result of a dramatic revelation unearthed from a City street that has led to a forgotten people being brought to life and a community embracing its full history.  On an October morning in 2003, a series of coffins were revealed during infrastructure upgrades in the heart of the Portsmouth’s downtown.  Through archaeology and DNA analysis the City confirmed the site was a segregated burying place for Africans and their descendants (likely both enslaved and free) and that as many as 200 individuals are buried below.  Their names are unknown and their resting place – in use from the early 1700s through to the 19th century – was paved over, built over and mostly forgotten.

The presentation will focus on what is known about the site’s history, the community’s efforts to memorialize the site, and a description of the Memorial and its components.

Join us to share in this powerful story at an illustrated lecture in honor of Black History Month.  Snow date Feb. 26th.

2-25 African

Portsmouth’s African Burying Ground Wed. Feb. 25th at 7pm

In 2015, the Portsmouth Community will complete the years long effort to honor those buried beneath Chestnut Street in Portsmouth’s downtown.

The Portsmouth African Burying Ground and Memorial Park – We Stand in Honor of Those Forgotten is the result of a dramatic revelation unearthed from a City street has led to a forgotten people being brought to life and a community embracing its full history.  On an October morning in 2003, a series of coffins were revealed during infrastructure upgrades in the heart of the Portsmouth’s downtown.  Through archaeology and DNA analysis the City confirmed the site was a segregated burying place for Africans and their descendants (likely both enslaved and free) and that as many as 200 individuals are buried below.  Their names are unknown and their resting place – in use from the early 1700s through to the 19th century – was paved over, built over and mostly forgotten.

The presentation will focus on what is known about the site’s history, the community’s efforts to memorialize the site, and a description of the Memorial and its components.

Join us to share in this powerful story at an illustrated lecture in honor of Black History Month.  Snow date Feb. 26th.

2-25 African